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Articles tagged with: Khaled Khalifa

Sold Rights »

[4 Nov 2008 | No Comment | 120 views]

Lumen, a literary inprint of Random House Mondadori acquired the Spanish rights to Khaled Khalifa’s In praise of Hatred.

Sold Rights »

[19 Sep 2008 | No Comment | 186 views]

We are happy to annonce that:
French rights to Khaled Khalifa’s ‘In praise of hatred’ have been sold to Sindbad, Actes Sud, Paris, France.
Dutch rights to the same title have been sold to De Geus, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Actes Sud is an independent French house, based in Arles. Sindbad is its inprint specialized in Arabic contemporary literature. For more on Actes Sud, click here.
De Geus is a literary Dutch house. It publishes, among many others, Assia Djebar, Nuruddin Farah, Laurent Gaudé, J.M.G. le Clézio, Amin Maalouf. For more details on the house, …

Press »

[14 Apr 2008 | No Comment | 545 views]
Khaled Khalifa in the New York Times

“Banning books is normal for us here, it’s funny, even a little absurd. It’s not like Europe ‚”Ooh, I’ve been censored”

News »

[11 Mar 2008 | No Comment | 171 views]
and the IPAF winner is…

On March 10th 2008, at the Rotana Beach Resort in Abu Dhabi, UAE, was held the ceremony of the IPAF prize.
The prize was given to Baha’a Taher, for his novel ‘Sunset oasis’.
From left to right, Elias Farkouh, Jabbour Douaihy and Khaled Khalifa, finalists to the IPAF prize, at breakfast!

News »

[1 Feb 2008 | No Comment | 133 views]

We are very proud to inform you that three of our authors are finalists to the most prestigious Arab literary prize ever:

“In praise of hatred”, by Khaled Khalifa, Syria,
“June rain”, by Jabbour Douaihy, Lebanon
“The land of Purgatory”, by Elias Farkouh, Jordan

Press »

[3 Jul 2007 | No Comment | 84 views]

Syrian author clashes with censors, urges liberty
Tue Jul 3, 2007
By Tom Perry
DAMASCUS (Reuters) – Author Khaled Khalifa tested the limits of freedom of expression in Syria with a novel exploring the government’s battle against Islamist militants in the 1980s. His “In Praise of Hatred”, published in Beirut, is officially banned in his own country. “They say the book is not permitted,” said the 43-year-old Syrian, smoking a cigarette as he leafed through a copy of the novel, its front cover concealed by newspaper.