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Articles tagged with: Jabbour Douaihy

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[23 Apr 2019 | No Comment | 74 views]
Douaihy’s “The king of India” shows that an Arab detective story is possible – or not

By Melhem Chaoul, for L’Orient littéraire, published April 2019.
Starting with the title, Malek al-Hind (The King of India): There are no kings (in that story), let alone Kings of the Indian peninsula. By this metaphor, Jabbour Douaihy signifies the absence of power, the absence of control over fate, such as the Viceroy of the Indies at the time of the British Empire who managed a state whose fate was decided elsewhere.
Zaccaria Mubarak’s destiny is thus fashioned, fluctuating like the “Raft of the Medusa” on the murky waters of countries and continents.
The novel begins …

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[27 Feb 2019 | No Comment | 52 views]
Jabbour Douaihy “The king of India”

A detective story set on the background of family and sectarian feuds, The king of India, explores with the right dose of irony, the meaning of attachment to the land.

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[18 Dec 2018 | No Comment | 60 views]
World Literature Today lists Jabbour Douaihy’s “Printed in Beirut” and Najla Jraissati Khoury’s “Pearls on a branch” among the must reads of 2018 English translations

Published by World Literature Today, December 2018.
As the year’s news of rising nationalistic strains and attacks against the press continued, the urgent need for translation became ever more apparent. More and more, translation across borders embodies resistance. Honoring all those who take part in this important work, we again offer 75 of the year’s English literary translations.
 
 

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[24 Oct 2018 | No Comment | 51 views]
Douaihy’s “Printed in Beirut” in the Midwest book review: “Exquisite irony”

Published by Midwest Book Review, October 2018
Farid Abou Char arrives in Beirut on a hot summer morning with his manuscript, looking for a publisher. He is turned down by all of them; nobody reads anymore, he is told. Instead, he accepts a job as a proofreader at the famous old print house Karam Bros., allegedly established in 1908. Disappointed by the menial tasks of checking catalogs and ad copy, Farid secretly hopes that his book will eventually be published.

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[22 Oct 2018 | No Comment | 43 views]
Booklist reviews Jabbour Douaihy’s “Printed in Beirut” – “scathing comedy of many errors”

Published by Booklist, October 2018
“Farid Abu Shaar, a young man earnestly convinced of his own (unproven) literary genius, seeks a publisher for his red-notebook manuscript, The Book to Come. His publication attempts with Beirut’s publishing houses prove futile: “No one reads,” one publisher insists. Although his Karam Brothers Press visit doesn’t lead to publication, he begrudgingly accepts a job as Arabic-language proofreader.

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[3 Jul 2018 | No Comment | 32 views]
Douaihy’s “Chased Away” featured in Words Without Borders

 
Novel excerpt published by Word Without Borders, special issue on Lebanon, July 2018
Translated by Paula Haidar.
At an armed checkpoint, sectarian tensions come to bear on one man’s suspect identity in this excerpt from Jabbour Douaihy’s novel Chased Away​.