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[18 Sep 2019 | No Comment | 24 views]
“Precise, hyper-observant”, “profoundly moving” – Full Stop blog’s insightful reivew of Sinan Antoon’s “The book of collateral damage”

By Will Preston, for Full Stop (2019)
(…)
The very concept of “collateral damage,” after all, rests on the logic that others lack their own stories. They are only a means to an end: an acceptable loss, a supporting character in the narrative of someone else’s war. But to what extent? Within the framework of Antoon’s novel, it is not just the country’s people, or history, or cities, that have been reduced to collateral damage in the great American tragedy of the Iraq War. It is Iraq itself.

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[18 Sep 2019 | No Comment | 23 views]

By Ghyath Manhel (University of Arkansas, Fayetteville – University of Kufa, Iraq), for World Literature Today (2019)
So many books have been written about the Iraq War (2003–2011) from both sides of that conflict, but Sinan Antoon’s The Book of Collateral Damage is unique in that it chooses to represent the human and environmental cost of that war. Nameer, an Iraqi American intellectual, visits his home country after the war and is traumatized by the hurt and damage he witnesses. Navigating the divide of his home and host cultures’ views of the war, he …

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[18 Sep 2019 | No Comment | 13 views]
The National, about Sinan Antoon’s “The book of collateral damage” : “Formally daring, stylistically inventive” “It challenges but it also impresses and enthrals”

Read The National’s review (2019)
In Antoon’s latest novel, The Book of Collateral Damage [aka Index], the Iraqi author returns to the subject of the Second Gulf War…
But Antoon is too good a writer to simply retread old terrain. For this, his fourth novel, he explores new ground by depicting turmoil and carnage through a series of richly diverse second-hand sources.

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[10 Jul 2019 | No Comment | 20 views]
NPR features Sinan Antoon’s “Index” (aka The book of collateral damage)

Bo Hamby and Simone Popperl produced and edited this interview for broadcast at NPR. Patrick Jarenwattananon adapted it for the Web.
The novelist and poet Sinan Antoon grew up in Baghdad, Iraq — a city that’s known many years of sorrow.
He was born to an Iraqi father and an American mother, and lived there until 1991. That was the year of the first U.S. invasion of Iraq, when he hid in the basement of a restaurant as U.S. bombs fell.
Antoon later moved to New York. But after the United States bombed …

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[3 Jul 2018 | No Comment | 56 views]
Philip Jenkins of The Christian Century calls Antoon “a Star of modern Arab fiction”

Published by Philip Jenkins for The Christian Century, June 29, 2018

Sinan Antoon is a star of modern Arab fiction, a multiply honored novelist whose books address critical questions of identity, memory, and history. He has an Iraqi Christian background but teaches at New York Univer­sity—a dislocation that resembles that of so many Middle Eastern Chris­tians in recent years. Antoon’s most recently translated novel, The Baghdad Eucha­rist, offers Westerners an unparalleled opportunity to understand these events. The book traces the historic catastrophe that has overcome—and is now uprooting—one of the world’s oldest Chris­tian communities.

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[21 Mar 2018 | No Comment | 64 views]
Sinan Antoon “Fifteen years ago, America destroyed my country” – New York Times OpEd contribution

This original contribution by Sinan Antoon was published on March 19th, 2018, in The New York Times.
When I was 12, Saddam Hussein, vice president of Iraq at the time, carried out a huge purge and officially usurped total power. I was living in Baghdad then, and I developed an intuitive, visceral hatred of the dictator early on. That feeling only intensified and matured as I did. In the late 1990s, I wrote my first novel, “I’jaam: An Iraqi Rhapsody,” about daily life under Saddam’s authoritarian regime. Furat, the narrator, was a young college …