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[21 Mar 2016 | No Comment | 97 views]
Liberation draws Yazbek’s portrait and reviews The Crossing, a “Colossal work”

By Jean-Louis Le Touzet, for Liberation, March 20, 2016
Photo credit: Mathieu Zazzo, Liberation
 
Men make war. But a woman, blonde, cat-eyed, 46-year old Syrian of high education was needed to paint Syria’s death. No other brush was ever dipped in as many tears to tell the intoxication of brutality in a country under the yoke of a double punishment: that of a totally deranged regime and that of the unbearable cruelty of fanatical Islamists . To be clear, about Syria, we read everything and read nothing. Rarely such a plunging view of demolition was ever published. This is what this …

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[16 Mar 2016 | No Comment | 146 views]
“A remarkable narrative to get rid of indifference” – Le Figaro on Yazbek’s The Crossing

By Charles Jaigu, for Le Figaro, March 13, 2016
(…) One must read this remarkable narrative to get rid of the indifference to the crackle of images, and of testimonies heard on the fly. It is not enough to know that terrible events are taking place in the world. A story longer than 140 signs needs to give them form and color.
(…)
Samar Yazbek’s story  is valuable as a literary testimony.  It is also valuable as a geopolitical analysis. It goes from the fog of war, the confusion of fighting, and gradually goes back to the general idea: quite simply, Bachar El Assad is the cause
behind all the evil… To those who… consider that the priority is primarily the fight …

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[16 Mar 2016 | No Comment | 148 views]
“A strikingly truthful book” – L’Express on Yazbek’s The Crossing

Interview by Christian Makarian for l’Express, Published March 9, 2016
Below are excerpts translated into English.
In a strikingly truthful book, The Crossing (Stock), Samar Yazbek tells the daily atrocities of the war in Syria. She also explores the irreversible mechanisms of ultra-violence…
How do you define yourself facing the dislocation of Syria?
I am a Syrian writer, nothing else. I am a secular, journalist and activist involved with human rights – including the rights of women. I am neither Alawite or Sunni, or Christian, I refuse to be defined by my confession. I am …

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[24 Feb 2016 | No Comment | 159 views]
Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun on Douaihy’s American Neighborhood: “One must absolutely read this book, imbued with intelligence and humanity”

By Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, for En attendant Nadeau, published on February 10, 2016
The American neighbourhood, last novel Jabbour Douaihy, is as a long love letter to Tripoli, Northern Lebanese city where the author spent much of his childhood and where he teaches French literature …
This beautiful novel, of classical style with the fate of its characters intersecting and intertwining, with no downtimes, is a pleasurable and emotional read.

This beautiful novel, of classical style with the fate of its characters intersecting and intertwining, with no downtimes, is a pleasurable and emotional read. …

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[20 Nov 2015 | No Comment | 282 views]
Douaihy in Le Monde des Livres: “The attacks of Paris: a deep stab in the back”

By Jabbour Douaihy, for Le Monde des Livres, November 19th, 2015
Photo credit: La Croix
 
We who, in the late 1970s, retreated, fleeing to Paris, during a first war, civil war among other things, which devastated Beirut and Lebanon as a whole, with its share of violence, where mere membership to a given community transformed men into targets. We who, today watch today in shock the tearful faces, sadly familiar to us, of the victims’ parents who have fallen simply they were there, a mother or a friend who seeks to understand, who cannot admit, and who, with the …

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[10 Nov 2015 | No Comment | 100 views]
La Cite, on Douaihy’s American Neighborhood: “A novel the power of which many documentarians would envy”

An interview conducted by William Irigoyen, for La Cite, published in November 2015.
A few excerpts below in the French original, and in English.
Photo credit: Samih Zaatari, La Cite.
Thus summed up in its broad lines, the story would present only little interest, if it did not give a new opportunity to the author to dissect this society he knows so well, and the flaws of which he loves depicting: corruption (“At the time of the elections, the rich were buying people’s votes; people wondered how they could have amassed such fortunes”); money that allows everything.
Book after …