Home » Archive

Articles in the Press Category

Press »

[23 Apr 2019 | No Comment | 66 views]
Douaihy’s “The king of India” shows that an Arab detective story is possible – or not

By Melhem Chaoul, for L’Orient littéraire, published April 2019.
Starting with the title, Malek al-Hind (The King of India): There are no kings (in that story), let alone Kings of the Indian peninsula. By this metaphor, Jabbour Douaihy signifies the absence of power, the absence of control over fate, such as the Viceroy of the Indies at the time of the British Empire who managed a state whose fate was decided elsewhere.
Zaccaria Mubarak’s destiny is thus fashioned, fluctuating like the “Raft of the Medusa” on the murky waters of countries and continents.
The novel begins …

Press »

[20 Mar 2019 | No Comment | 19 views]
Herald reviews Khalifa’s “Death is hard work”: “Stunning”

The Herald, by Alastair Mabbott, published March 16th, 2019
In a Damascus hospital, Abdel Latif breathes his last, his dying wish that his body be laid to rest alongside his sister Layla in their hometown of Anabiya. Normally Anabiya would only be a two-hour drive away, but in a Syria devastated by war Abdel’s children Bobol, Hussein and Fatima face an uncertain journey, with no idea what obstacles and dangers might lie in wait.

Press »

[27 Feb 2019 | No Comment | 62 views]
“Masterly” – The New York Times Review of Books about Khaled Khalifa’s “Death is hard work”

A review by Elliot Ackerman for The New York Times Review of Books, published February 26th, 2019
How many times can you read about barrel bombs falling on civilians in Aleppo or Islamic State execution squads or sarin gas attacks before the sheer quantity of incidents denudes each of meaning? The facts, devoid of a narrative, lose their weight. That’s the power of mass violence: its ability to transform specific loss into general loss, numbing our collective consciousness. This is why novelists like Khalifa are so critical in these times. They …

Press »

[26 Feb 2019 | No Comment | 117 views]
Elias Khoury’s My name is Adam “a masterpiece of structure, vision, and imagination” – Los Angeles Review of Books

Interview by Tom Zoellner, for the Los Angeles Review of Books, Published February 18th, 2019
ELIAS KHOURY MIGHT BE the Lebanese version of what James Michener is to the United States, or Carlos Fuentes is to Mexico— a big-hitting novelist who aims not merely for the human heart but also for the soul of a nation. His latest book, My Name Is Adam, is the first volume of a projected trilogy about the nakba — the Arabic term for the forced removal of Palestinians from the newborn state of Israel in 1948. The protagonist …

Press »

[26 Feb 2019 | No Comment | 48 views]
Haaretz: Elias Khoury, a “definite Nobel Prize material”, with “remarkable literary skill” writes a “poignant” novel, “close to perfection” – “My name is Adam”

A review by Avraham Burg, for the Haaretz, May 2018
It’s very hard to review something so close to perfection. About all one can do after such an engrossing read is describe, quote, compare and reflect. Elias Khoury’s remarkable literary skill and the brilliant Hebrew translation of Yehouda Shenhav-Sharabani (a work of art in itself) make “Children of the Ghetto: My Name is Adam” one of the most poignant and important novels of recent years. After it, no words are needed, if only because it is one of the most eloquent works ever …

Press »

[26 Feb 2019 | No Comment | 29 views]
Elias Khoury’s My name is Adam “an overwhelming book of rare beauty” – Mediapart

Review by  Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, for En Attendant Nadeau / Mediapart, published May 2018
There are subjects that force the novel to reinvent itself. As the narrator of the last book of Elias Khoury puts it, “I am writing a novel that is unlike any other, because it belongs to a literary genre that has no name and I doubt that it exists “.