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[21 Mar 2018 | No Comment | 35 views]

Published by The Jordan Times, February 11th, 2018
Tripoli, past and present
Lebanese novelist Jabbour Douaihy situates his story in Tripoli, in the north of his country. Though it is Lebanon’s second largest city and filled with noteworthy ancient architecture, particularly from the Mamluk period, Tripoli seldom gets the attention it merits.

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[21 Mar 2018 | No Comment | 77 views]

Published by Qantara, June 7, 2017
In his novel ″The Baghdad Eucharist″, Iraqi author Sinan Antoon probes deeply into the nature of loss and its impact on collective memory. Intertwining two distinct threads, he teases the reader to reach a conclusion about a community on the edge. Marcia Lynx Qualey read the book.

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[13 Mar 2018 | No Comment | 75 views]
Acclaimed Algerian author Waciny Laredj about Nasrallah’s “Second Dog War”: A work by “one of the most important Arab voices”, “reminiscent of Buzatti”

Published by Alquds Alarabi Newspaper, March 7, 2018
Nasrallah’s experience places him among the most important contemporary Arab authors (…)

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[1 Feb 2018 | No Comment | 60 views]
Kirkus reviews Douaihy’s American neighborhood – “Brisk and affecting novel

Published by Kirkus Reviews, September 13th, 2017
A cross-section of life in one Tripoli neighborhood, from a wealthy resident to a housecleaner to a terrorist. This brisk and affecting novel by veteran Lebanese writer Douaihy (June Rain, 2015, etc.) is set during the early stages of the Iraq War and follows three archetypal characters.

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[1 Feb 2018 | No Comment | 92 views]
Le Monde on Douaihy’s Printed in Beirut: “A fake thriller, but a real comedy”, “Elegant” and “far from stereotypes”

By Florence Noiville, for Le Monde, publisher on December 21st, 2017

Lebanese novelist Jabbour Douaihy offers a fake thriller, but a real comedy, tribute to Arabic writing and printing.
Here is a Lebanese novel that is far from the stereotypes of Europeans on Middle Eastern literature. There are no reminiscences of war, no religious questions, no community issues. It is about Beirut, the history of which is told through that of a printing press, starting 1914. But it is also about the laughable posture of the contemporary writer.
From the first lines, the humor of Jabbour Douaihy prevails.

Press »

[30 Nov 2017 | No Comment | 107 views]
“Ingenious character, and a literary approach on the verge of the unimaginable” – GP, Sweden, reviews Yazbek’s Blue Pen

Yazbek lets the child testify, a review by Mattia Hagberg, for GP, Sweden, October 2017
How do you describe a modern war? How do you put words on the most horrendous? These questions are all over the Syrian author and journalist Samar Yazbek’s novel The Blue Pen.
Trapped in a basement in Damascus, Rima is sitting and writing and drawing. She is a forgotten girl  in Syria’s hell. Nobody knows that she is sitting there waiting to be rescued.